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A consistently popular dog breed if ever there was one, 2,115 Border Collies were registered in the UK in 2013, rising slightly to 2,142 in 2014. The second most popular type of dog in the Pastoral dog breed category, the Border Collie is comfortably ahead of its 3rd placed rival, the Shetland Sheepdog, which only had 1,112 and 1,060 registered in 2013 and 2014 respectively. Despite having secured its second place position, the Border Collie is still far from being the most popular dog in this particular breed group, as for the second year running over 5,500 more German Shepherds have been registered.

Key Facts
Size Medium
Exercise Requirements 2+ hour
Coat Length Medium
Lifespan 13 years (approx.)
dog-544736_1280 Personality & Training

Originally bred in Scotland and the north of England for the purpose of herding sheep, Border Collies demonstrate amazing physical stamina and are renowned for their intelligence and aptitude toward working. Though they are still used by farmers around the world to help herd livestock, Border Collies are more commonly seen as domestic pets these days.

The reason they are so popular is that they are great company. They love a good run around and are extremely playful, making them perfect for families with older children who are willing and able to keep up with them. However, due to their intelligence, Border Collies require almost constant mental stimulation, and they may come across as overly demanding if you are not prepared for it.

When it comes to training, Border Collies are incredibly easy to inculcate. Their remarkable intelligence allows them to pick up instructions quickly and their natural obedience means that they will almost always follow a command the very second that it has been issued. We'd recommend one of the first things you teach them is not to bark and to be silent on command, as Border Collies are a surprisingly vocal breed of dog.

Exercise & Living Conditions

If it has not been made clear by now, exercise is as essential to the health of a Border Collie as air, water and food. They should be given a minimum of 2 hours of exercise a day, with the occasional hour on top to ensure that any energy they have built up is well and truly spent. Depriving Border Collies of stimulation will make them all but unbearable to live with, which is why this point cannot be stressed enough!

Failure to provide them with adequate physical and mental challenges can result in them developing peculiar behavioural quirks, and they have been known to alleviate their frustration and boredom by scratching and chewing furniture or digging. Having said that, if you are prepared to provide them with all the attention they need and exercise them regularly, you are unlikely to find a more loyal and loving dog.

Even if provided with ample hours of exercise, small apartments or flats are not at all ideal for Border Collies to live in, especially if they are expected to be left alone in doors all day. A home with a garden, or a near-by park for them to play in, on the other hand would suit them perfectly, and if it is possible for someone to be with them more or less throughout the day, all the better.

Grooming

Border Collies don't have the longest coats in the world, but neither are they particularly short. They do not need to be doted upon but it will not hurt them, or the state of your furniture, to give them a brush once or twice a week. When it comes to bathing, Border Collies should be given a rinse every three to four months, unless they get themselves muddy or are beginning to smell unpleasant.

A Border Collies nails can grow sharp pretty quickly, so a monthly trim is advised. We also suggest you keep a close eye on their ears and clean them once a week, as they are somewhat prone to getting dirty and becoming infected.